Tag Archives: health and fitness

Tempo Running…Intensive Tempo

Tempo Running is NOT Speed Training Part 4

 

In Part 3 of Tempo Running, we discussed the purpose of Extensive Tempo. Extensive Tempo is when runs are between 60-80% and these runs aid in the process of recovery. At times, even in the trained athlete, the formation of lactic acid can occur depending on the intensity of the runs. Extensive Tempo is usually what’s done during the General Prep phase (the first 8-10 weeks of training) to help lay the foundation for more intense tempo runs and higher intensity work.

 

Today we are talking about Intensive Tempo. Intensive Tempo usually follows Extensive Tempo work in that the ground work was laid with Extensive earlier in the training cycle. Now we can get down to some much more intense runs because if you have followed the progressions properly then your athletes should be ready to handle the demands that Intensive Tempo can bring.

 

Intensive Tempo is a fine line between Speed Endurance and Special Endurance in that the speed (intensity), recovery, volume and distance run are major factors in determining which category the runs can go in (Tricky little system right?), but one thing is certain and that is that the Intensive tempo is shared between the anaerobic and aerobic system.

 

Because Intensive Tempo runs are done between 80-90%+, there will be high levels of lactate that will form during the runs. Unlike Extensive Tempo, Intensive focuses on the quality and control of the run which means that the volume is pretty low when dealing with Intensive runs versus Extensive runs and not to mention that lactic acid will form and hinder muscle activity eventually because of the speed and distance of the runs.

 

Now depending on the kind of system that you run, Intensive runs are still done the day after speed work and they can even be done during the General Prep phase at the end of the week to help set the foundation for true Special Endurance and Speed Endurance runs later on in the Early season training. They key is getting creative with the workouts and how they are ordered. Long as you are following the proper progression model of building the base first (Extensive) and moving up to the more intense runs (speed endurance, special endurance, lactate threshold runs) is what’s really important.

 

Now it’s important to remember NOT to start Tempo work off with Intensive runs being that you want a team of athletes around long enough to compete for you during the competition season. I would hate for your athletes to abandon you because you want to show them how tough you are!!!!! Trust me…knowledge is better than toughness!

 

Since Intensive Tempo is done during the Early season after the General Prep phase here is a sample week of how I would set it up:

 

Mon: Speed/Acceleration/Plyo’s

Tue: Tempo (Intensive)/Circuit drills

Wed: General Strength/Grass strides

Thur: Speed/Speed Endurance/Event Specific

Fri: Special Endurance/Tempo (Intensive – depending on where you are in the training plan)

Sat: Rest

Sun: Rest

 

Now that we have the format, let’s look at some Intensive Tempo workouts:

 

The most famous Extensive tempo workout is 8-10x200m right? Well, you can carry that workout on into the Early season, but be creative and breakup the runs into sets, give the athletes more rest (since they are, afterall, running a lot faster…right!!!?) so they can run faster!

 

-2x3x200m. Speed: B-27-28 sec, G-31-32 sec. Rest: 4-5’ b/w reps, 8-10’ b/w sets

-4x250m. Speed: B-26@200m, G-30@200m. Rest: 5-6’ b/w reps

-2x3x250m. Speed: B-26@200m, G-31@200m. Rest: 5-6’ b/w reps, 10’ b/w sets

-2x3x300m. Speed: B-42-44 sec, G-48-50 sec. Rest: 6’ b/w reps, 10-12’ b/w sets

-2x300m-400m-300m. Speed: determine times based on the level of athlete you have

-2x350m-250m combo’s. Rest: 5-6’ b/w reps, 10’ b/w sets

-3-4x300m-200m combo’s. Rest: 5’ b/w reps, 8-10’ b/w sets

-3x500m. Speed: 80%. Rest: 6-8’ b/w reps

-2-3x600m. Speed: 80%. Rest: 8’ b/w reps

 

As you can see, writing Intensive Tempo workouts aren’t hard. They are just extensions of Extensive tempo with faster runs, less volume, more recovery and faster times…that’s all! Yes, it really is that simple…actually a lot of things are really that simple!!!

 

Continue in knowledge my friends!

 

 

 

Charone

 

Tempo Running…Continuous Tempo

Tempo Running is NOT Speed Training Part 2

 

In Part One of the Tempo Running series we talked about and distinguished the difference between what speed training is and what tempo running consists of. Speed is defined as the ability to make body parts move through a given range of motion in the least amount of time. Speed is part of the Anaerobic (without oxygen) Energy System and is fueled by ATP-CP and has the ability to last anywhere from 4-7 seconds and are performed at high intensities from 90% and up. Tempo running is part of the Aerobic (with oxygen) Energy System and, just like speed, has various components to it in different categories. The Aerobic Energy System is fueled by an abundant energy source, oxygen, at low intensities from 40% to 85-90% and can last anywhere from 1 minute and 30 seconds to and through 2 hours long. Still with me so far? No! Falling asleep…

 

Hey, hey…wake up (scratches nails on a chalkboard)!

 

Now that I have your attention…

 

The low intensity type of tempo run is the Continuous Tempo run. It’s in the category of general endurance which means that it has no specificity to it and consists mainly of long steady state running in duration of 25-40 minutes. The intensity is low enough that the athletes should be running at what’s called ‘talk pace’ in that they should be able to talk to their training partners while running and if they can’t they the pace is too fast and too hard.

 

There aren’t many different types of ways to do Continuous tempo: 25-30 minutes of steady running, 30-40 minutes of steady running and of course fartlek running. Fartlek running will more than likely give you the most variation since that consists of run-jog combo’s. There is no right or wrong way to do fartlek runs. Just mix up running with slow jogging at varying paces at varying times and there you have it. For example, you can do 1 minute jog followed by 30 seconds of running, followed by 30 seconds of jogging followed by 20 seconds of running and on and on for 20-30 minutes straight.

 

However, these types of runs are optimal for oxygen rich blood which results in great cardiovascular and cardiorespiratory health in athletes and people in general. These types of runs are great at helping athletes recover and builds the base upon which specific and anaerobic work can be built…HOWEVER…these are not the type of runs I would recommend for sprinters.

 

Now, when I say sprinters, I’m referring to the 100-200-Sprint Hurdler-Horizontal and Vertical Jumpers. Notice I didn’t put in 400 or Long Sprint Hurdler!!! Now are they considered sprinters? Of course they are. The difference is the grey area they operate in when it comes to the Aerobic System and their event areas. Everyone agrees that the long sprint and long sprint hurdles have to develop some aerobic capacity for their respective events, the problem is how much and that’s a long standing question that isn’t answered easily.

 

For the long sprinters and hurdlers I, personally, would recommend at least once a week of Continuous Tempo runs of anywhere from 15-30 minutes depending on their level of experience. I don’t have my athletes go over 20 minutes honestly, but I guess this would depend on how your training system is set up and what you believe in as far as getting athletes to lay a solid foundation for the long sprint and hurdle events. Since Continuous Tempo is great in aiding recovery then they should be done on a Recovery day and in my case that would be a Wednesday (Wednesdays are usually Active Recovery days in my training program) and after General Strength Circuits the long sprint athletes would for a 15-20 minute run.

 

For example: Preseason

Monday – Speed/Acceleration training/plyos

Tuesday – Circuit drills/Figure Eights (on grass)

Wednesday – General strength circuit/Continuous Tempo (15-20 minutes)

Thursday – Short Speed/Acceleration training/plyos

Friday – Extensive Tempo/Special Endurance

Saturday (if you’re into 6 days a week training) – Tempo (Continuous – 15-20 minutes)

Sunday – Complete Rest

 

Now the catch with that is the athletes have to try and cover or at least get as close to 2.5 miles as they can. These aren’t Cross Country runners so I can’t tell female sprinters to cover 3 miles or a 5k in 20 minutes! That’s just unrealistic! But if they can, hey, great for them and their aerobic capacity and the Specific work will be great, but for the sprinter that doesn’t love those long runs, it’s going to be a long…and I mean long…20 minutes! And if you practice 6 days a week then another day would be a Saturday for a long run or even Sunday before the week begins. This will continue to aid in recovery and help build their aerobic capacity for the long sprint events and the lactate work wont be as bad!

 

Now Lactate work…HAHAHA…that’s a whole nother (yes I said whole nother! Lol) topic…

 

Stay tuned!

 

Continue in knowledge my friends!

 

Charone  

How to Get Faster…The Whole Plan!

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How to Get Faster…The Whole Plan!

 

Speed is a must have commodity in today’s world. Internet providers compete with the fastest speeds, restaurants compete with who can deliver the best quality of food the fastest while still offering great customer service and hospitals now have billboards that show how fast a patient can be seen by an emergency room doctor! It’s no longer acceptable just to be good at what you do, you have to be fast while maintaining your quality whether it’s service or sports training.

 

In the industry that I represent, speed is not only a must have commodity, speed kills! As long as you are fast you can be trained in quality and how to become even faster. Speed is a skill and that’s represented everywhere even in the internet business. The speeds get faster with the internet connections because the engineers continue to design them that way, to become faster, to handle loads of information and downloads while maintaining the speed that it’s designed and advertised to maintain. In the sports industry it’s the same concept. Speed is definitely a skill that is taught and it is taught often and with each athlete we want them to be as fast as their genetics, training, skill level and technique will allow them to be.

 

What I’ve realized on the internet is that you will find PLENTY of articles and blog post (including mine!) about how to get faster and within those posts and articles you will find workouts, but what many don’t realize is that most of those so-called ‘workouts’ aren’t really up to date information or they really are just drills which rarely apply to getting people to run faster! Don’t get me wrong, the drills have their place in teaching the skill, but many coaches, such as myself, don’t consider them in actually getting the athlete faster.

 

So how do we get faster? Simple answer: by running fast! However, we all know the process is not as simple as it sounds and since it will take me pages on pages and articles on top of articles to explain how to go through this process of max speed, sub max speed, general strength training, special strength, tempo runs, how to set the tempo pace and endurance and how to incorporate all of these into making you faster!!!! That would take at least 65 articles and 100 blog post (I’m exaggerating of course but you get the point, then again, it might actually take that to explain everything!).

 

So how do we simplify this process? Well, what if I told you there already is a program out there that simplified the process and put everything together in a 23 week program that is ready to go and all you have to do is implement it, adjust it based on your needs and the needs of your athletes or just plug and play? You probably wouldn’t believe me would you? Don’t worry, I wouldn’t believe me either. Well, I’m here to tell you that such a program DOES exist! It’s called ‘5 Rings, 2 Program: A Guide to Championship Performance and Success’. This Ebook explains and goes through the training that lead my athletes to win 5 Team State championships with 2 different programs in a 7 year span! It has everything that I described in it:

 

  • 23 weeks of workouts already designed and ready to implement
  • General strength circuits
  • Speed workouts and how to implement them
  • Speed endurance workouts
  • Tempo runs and what pace to go at in each part of training
  • Rest and recovery methods
  • How to use special strength to bridge the gap between speed and strength
  • How and when speed/power athletes use endurance to get faster
  • Direct access to me and how to reach me to answer any of your questions
  • Much more…!

 

 

This is an Ebook that’s delivered within minutes to your email and only you have access to it and you have it immediately! No boring drills, just plain workouts and how to implement them with explanations on each training phase and what should be done each week.

 

Now how much would something like this cost? A book with this kind of information can go for $49.95-$39.95, but that’s not how much this one cost. The typical Ebook usually cost $37 right? Not this one! Most discounted Ebooks will go for $20…but I’m practically giving this book away for $10!!!!

 

No, that is not a misprint or a coupon price…it’s real…just $10 and this Ebook with all this information on secrets to getting athletes faster, whether it’s track and field, baseball, football, basketball, soccer, etc, can be yours within 2-3 minutes of ordering.

 

Just go to this link and go to the Store!

 

http://athleticspeed13.wix.com/totalathleticspeed

 

 

Remember, it’s just $10 and it holds the secrets to getting faster, the how and the why!!!

 

Continue in knowledge my friends!

Image

 

 

Charone

How to Properly Design a Dynamic Warm up…

Seems like I’ve been gone for a minute, but I’m back now…had to pack up and move to Georgia (more on that later), but for now let’s get to it with this warm up…
 
With the advancement in training methodologies over the past 20 years, it is in the best interest of coaches, athletes and parents to stay up to date on the latest and most recent methods and theories of training especially for sports that are deeply rooted in speed, strength and power. These sports have to stay up to date on the scientific as well as the actual training practices which consist of having a working knowledge of chemistry, physics, anatomy and physiology and biomechanics (Remember, I didn’t say you needed a four year degree to understand or know these, I just said all you need is the desire to educate yourself and having a working knowledge of these in the sport you desire to be an expert in). Neglecting to study these areas can result in many athletes not being able to reach their full potential in the sport they desire.
 
Since we are talking about training methodologies we have to start somewhere and there’s no better or simpler place to start than the warm up. As we research the years of how warm ups were structured and executed we find that the warm ups of the past are no longer valid in helping the athlete reach a state of maximum readiness especially for speed and power athletes. The old warm up, commonly referred to as a “static warm up”, consisted of jogging anywhere from 2 to 4 laps, static stretching and a few drills! That’s about it for that warm up and the athletes was expected to be ready to go after that!
 
However, once we learned how the chemistry of muscles worked we started to move towards a “movement” warm up that became known as the “dynamic” warm up. This warm up involves everything from muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints and puts everything through its full range of motion thus preparing the athlete for speed and power workouts.
 
The design of a dynamic warm up isn’t really hard, but it should be well thought out and supervised. The coach and athlete must know what is being accomplished with this warm up and why. Being armed with this knowledge the coach can then design an appropriate warm up for speed and power days.
 
 The simplest way to design a dynamic warm up is to remember to go from low intensity movements to high intensity movements (Yes! It really is as simple as that). A sample dynamic warm up that I have designed for my sprinters on our speed days goes as follows:
 
SPRINTERS WARM UP
 
PART 1: IN FLATS
 
3X100M TURNAROUNDS AT TALK PACE
 
  1. 2X400M (2 LAPS) OF BUILD UP 50M FOLLOWED BY 50M WALK.  DURING THE WALK, DO 10 DYNAMIC WARM UP JUMPS (BOUNDS, CARIOCA, ANKLE HOPES, FRONT LUNGES, C-SKIPS, SIDE LUNGES, BACKWARD RUNS, STAR JUMPS, SLIDE SHUFFLE, MOGUL JUMPS).
 
  1. HIP MOBILITY (LEG SWINGS, EXTENSORS, PEDASTALS, 10X EACH LEG)
 
3X100M, 50% EFFORT FOCUSING ON STAYING TALL, TIGHT ABS
 
  1. SPEED DRILLS EVERY 10M FOR 100M (A SKIP, B SKIP, SIDE SKIP W/ARM SWINGS TURNING AROUND EVERY 10M, C SKIP, ANKLING, STRAIGHT LEG BOUND)
 
3X100M, 75%, FOCUSING ON STAYING TALL, STEPPING OVER THE OPPOSITE KNEE
 
  1. 2-3X30M SPRINT EXERCISES (FAST LEG A RUN, FAST LEG B RUN, C             
SKIPS, A HOLD/R/L/BOTH LEGS)
 
PART 2:  IN SPIKES
 
  1. MODEL RUNNING, 2X30M EACH (L-3 STEP FAST A, R-3 STEP FAST A, 2 STEP FAST A, L/R SINGLE LEG FAST A FOR 20M)
 
3 X FALLING STARTS IN SPIKES FOR 20M (POWER OFF THE LINE, PUNCHING THE KNEES FORWARD)
2-3 X 3 POINT STARTS OR BLOCKS X 30-40M
 
PART 3:  FOR HURDLERS ONLY, IN SPIKES AND USING BLOCKS
 
  1. 3-4 X 4-5 HURDLES WITH 5 STRIDES, 11.5M – 12M BETWEEN HURDLES FOR WOMEN; 12.5M – 13M FOR MEN
 
  1. 3-4 X 2-3 HURDLES WITH 3 STRIDES BETWEEN HURDLES
 
  1. 2 X 2 HURDLES USING BLOCKS, 300/400 HURDLERS DO 2 X 2-3 HURDLES FROM BLOCKS ON THE CURVE
 
  1. 15-20 MINUTES REST BEFORE RACE
 
Notice how the entire sequence of exercises go from very low intensity to very high intensity, mimicking competition settings and effort. This is important to mimic the intensity of the competition within these exercises as to prepare the athlete for the demands of the sport. This warm up, in particular, was inspired by Loren Seagrave, and a leading expert in the field of biomechanics.   
 
I hope this sample and analysis helps you in your search for knowledge about modern day training theories and gives you a road map on where to begin. Stay tuned as I will continue to post more speed and power analysis and workout strategies.
 
Continue in knowledge my friends!
 
Charone